Places of interest Places of interest

Merkato is the largest open-air market place in Africa. Here, over 100,000 sellers and consumers do hot business in a single day. More than 1.2 million Birr (approximately 141, 176 U.S dollars) is transacted daily in this market.

Shiromeda is the market on Entoto Road where you can get all types of traditional Ethiopian clothing.

Monuments
The statue of Abune Petros, the archbishop executed by the Italian invading troops, the liberation monument around Arat Kilo, the martyrs' monument around Sidest kilo, the Andinet statue erected in memory of the fallen troops during the invasion of Somalia, the statue of Emperor Menelik at the heart of the city called Arada and the Lion of Judah erected in front of the Ethio-Djibouti Railway are some of the historical sites in Addis that are worth visiting.

The lion is the symbol of heroism and resistance to Ethiopians. Especially, during the period of monarchy, the lion was the icon of imperial dignity. Bearing this fact in mind, don't get surprised if you see the sclupture of lions in many places. In Addis Ababa, there are two lion sculptures located within a close radius of each other.

 

the statue of Emperor Menelik
the statue of Emperor Menelik
the liberation monument around Arat Kilo
the statue of Emperor Menelik

Russia had several literary giants such as Gogol, Chekov, Gorky and Pushkin. Alexander Pushkin has a history that links him with Ethiopia. According to some history books, his grandfather, Hannibal, had his roots in Ethiopia. Thus, a bust has been erected in Addis in Pushkin's honor and memory. An avenue is also called after his name.

Petros was one of the first four Ethiopian archbishops anointed by the Patriarch of the Alexandria Coptic Church. He was the archbishop of Wello province diocese. In 1936, the Italian invading army annexed much of Ethiopia. It is at this time that Abune Petros went to an area called Menz in North Shoa district and joined the patriots led by the sons of Ras Kassa. His aim was to formulate a plan to reverse the blatant aggression of the Italian army. However, he was captured in 1937 without realizing his dreams.

Palaces

The Ethiopian kings had no permanent central city as from the end of the Zagwe dynasty until the establishment of the Gondar metropolis. They were thus, most of the time, staying & settling in a certain locality for an average of not more than 4 years. As such, the kings were not fortunate to build up permanent central city particularly as from 1260 until the 16th century. Hence, the king was only able to build up a "tent town", (provisional mobile town) until a limited and certain period of time. Whereas no permanent metropolis was initiated by then, it was also impossible to think of any other palace existing during that period, except for some palace-like residences. However, when viewed in a relatively manner, there have been observed the so-called palaces starting from the reign of Menelik II.

Sheikh Hogele Palace:

SHEH HOJEJE RESIDENCEIf you travel from Piazza, westward on the Ambo road, past St. Paul hospital and the Pasteur Institute, you will  come across Sheik Hogele Palace after traveling through a narrow asphalt road around the Commercial Bank of Ethiopia. The name Shegole is a contraction of the first  two names of Sheikh al Hassen, the chief of the Benishangul Gumuz people in Menelik's time. Shegole was the palace, which he built as a residence after being called to Addis Ababa from his birth place by the order of the Emperor.

 

Jubilee Palace:

You may see a compound with an attractive fence and lush and tall trees inside a little further up from Meskel Square. This is the palace built to commemorate the silver jubilee of the last Ethiopian monarch, Emperor Haile Selassie. Although the palace is not open to visitors, it is still possible to admire its marvelous exterior while passing along the road. The palace will be opened for visitors and tourists in the future.

Entoto Menelik Palace: In Addis Ababa, there are old and modern buildings and monuments. These include the city's municipality, the Economic Commission for Africa, the old post office, the Commercial Bank of Ethiopia, Hilton and Sheraton hotels as well as the UN convention center.

Some of the historical sites in Addis that are worth visiting are:

The statue of Abune Petros

Abune Petros Statuecommemorating the archbishop executed by the Italian invading troops, the liberation monument around Arat Kilo, the martyrs' monument around Sidest kilo, the Andinet statue erected in memory of the fallen troops during the invasion of Somalia, the statue of Emperor Menelik at the heart of the city called Arada and the Lion of Judah erected in front of the Ethio-Djibouti Railway.

Some 140 historic buildings are listed as requiring protection and conservation by Addis Wubet, a local NGO. Addis Wubet is concentrating on taking care of the ones that are not under the custodianship of churches or official bodies, since those - mainly residences of the former nobility or merchants - are the most vulnerable.

A big diversity of immigrants has left its traces, among them Italians, Armenians, Indians, Central Europeans etc. Many of them are hardly visible, since Ethiopian town houses are mostly hidden behind high walls, so that the public awareness is limited. Protecting, renovating and making the houses visible and accessible can become a way of integrating these assets into the city's life and contribute to its attraction.

The Mahatma Gandhi Street provides an environment of medium scale commercial buildings, stemming mainly from the first quarter of the 20th century. The ensemble, though highly differentiated in it's individual appearance, gives a uniform impression due to similar heights and extensions of the houses. The backyard area is densely populated and provides a big variety of businesses. 

Addis Wubet:

ADDIS WUBET is Ethiopia‘s first NGO devoted exclusively to historical preservation of Heritage Sites in Addis Ababa, and the sustainable management thereof. Founded in 2005 by Princess Mariam Senna Asfa Wossen, it is managed by a board consisting of local and international leaders of the private sector.